May 14, 2015

#twitterfiction week is in full swing

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logo (1)We’re in the heart of The Twitter Fiction Festival, which kicked off on Monday with a love-story-in-tweets by Everything I Never Told You novelist Celeste Ng.

This year’s festival, which runs through Friday, May, 15, will feature tweeted stories by 24 well-known authors (among them Lemony Snicket, Lauren Beukes, and Jonathan Evison), and anyone else who wants to chime in under the hashtag #twitterfiction. Coming up on today’s schedule:

10AM: Margaret Atwood (@margaretatwood)
Margaret Atwood’s Film Previews on a Plane: the Helpful Summaries repurposes words drawn from the trailer copy for plane movies.

11AM: Jackie Collins (@jackiecollins)
A beautiful, young actress. A horny old married producer. An accomplished and elegant wife. It’s complicated and sexy. Who will be the winner in this triangle?

2PM: Beth Cato (@bathcato)
@BethCato seeks out the magic and mystery of the everyday as she alternates between evocative fantasy and science fiction poems and short stories.

4PM: Congressman Steve Israel (@BySteveSsreal)
The Zen of Dick Cheney: @BySteveIsrael reveals the inner-Cheney thru secret NSA recordings of his meditations.

The Twitter Fiction Festival began in 2012, shortly after the novelist Jennifer Egan tweeted the serialized short story “Black Box,” which later appeared in print in The New Yorker. The first Festival featured a crime story from Elliot Holt, which unfolded from three different “witnesses’” accounts; a project inspired by Italo Calvino’s “Italian Folk Tales”; a retelling of Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw set in the White House; and more than 20 other stories from 5 continents and in 5 languages.

This year’s marathon will wrap up IRL at SubCulture on Bleecker Street, where authors Gayle Forman, Daniel José Older, Anna North, Myke Cole, and Lyndsay Faye will create #TwitterFiction stories LIVE on stage. (!?) The $20 tickets include a glass of wine and are available here.

 

Taylor Sperry is a former Melville House editor.

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