August 31, 2016

This is the Soviet Ray Bradbury cartoon you’ve been waiting for

by

Bradbury, around the time There Will Come Soft Rains was published.

Bradbury, around the time There Will Come Soft Rains was published.

Ray Bradbury: science fiction author, namesake of a patch of Mars, and Last Interview series participant. In 1950, a twenty-nine-year-old Bradbury published There Will Come Soft Rains, which would become one of his signature short stories. It depicts a California morning in the year 2026, as a robotic house wakes itself up and begins preparing its residents for a busy day: making them breakfast, laying their clothes out, and so forth.

There is, naturally, a twist, and one fun way of learning what it is (besides reading the story), is to watch this Soviet cartoon adaptation, Budet Laskovyj Dozhd’, made by the Uzbekfilm studio in 1984, and directed by Nazim Tulyakhodzhayev. It’s a beaut — austere, creepy, and oddly warm. Do yourself a favor:

Yeah. Yeah.

For a bonus, you can also watch Tulyakhodzhayev’s adaptation of Bradbury’s The Veldt from a few year later. No subtitles on this one, but then, there’s not too much dialogue either:

Great stuff.

MobyLives