April 1, 2017

TGI∞

by

Saint John the Baptist, by Leonardo da Vinci. The portrait was originally accompanied by a speech bubble in which John is saying, “This guy, am I right?”

Well, that was a week! As you strive to put the manic Monday, Tuesday heartbreak, Wednesday evening blues, Thursday’s children, and shimmy coco of Friday behind you, here are a few of the stories we’ve been chasing, in case you missed ’em, and a couple things we didn’t quite get to:

Leonardo’s “Virgin of the Rocks,” which first occurred to him as a possible drink order, and was later realized as a painting.

We also featured excerpts from a few of our past, present, and future books:

As well as notes from a couple of our authors:

Leonardo’s “Vitruvian Man”: somber study of the human form, or original Renaissance ¯\_(ツ)_/¯?

There were a couple news stories we just didn’t get to this week:

The wonderful thing about Robert Silvers was everything. The great hub of a great wheel, incredibly good-natured, wonderful at putting people at ease, witty, almost prankish, as if winking and letting you in on a joke, but the joke was the fun of it all.

I’d vacillate idiotically between addressing him as Mr. Silvers (out of awe) and calling him Bob (since he was such a sweetheart). Generosity seemed the soul of his mind. In fact, he gave me the feeling that kindness might be the highest form of intelligence. We’ll always miss him.

Will Evans, publisher of Deep Vellum and more recently co-founder of Cinestate, wrote us to say that Braziller and Silvers departing in the same week “is doubly painful. We’re losing the leaders of that generation of engaged, deep thinkers who considered literature and writing integral to the vitality and progress of our society —not just in arts but in everything. I hope to emulate that generation of New York publishing, which I admire deep in my core to this day, in all I do.” Well said, Will.

Meantime, that fluttering feeling in your chest is because we published three new books this week:

Finally — since you’re still in your peejays, here’s a Saturday morning cartoon for ya. A classic, in fact:

MobyLives