Open this book Hunting of the Snark

The Hunting of the Snark

AN AGONY IN EIGHT FITS

Illustrated by Mahendra Singh


Adventures in Wonderland 
is perhaps Lewis Carroll’s most famous literary work. It has been adapted countless times in countless ways, from the recent film by Tim Burton starring Johnny Depp, to the famous Disney cartoon, Alice in Wonderland, from 1951. While Alice certainly deserves the attention, she has overshadowed some of Carroll’s other classic works.

Now, The Hunting of the Snark, one of Carroll’s most beloved and linguistically playful poems, comes to life in this wickedly inventive new edition. Perfectly suited to the modern form of the graphic novel, Singh’s illustrated adaptation compliments the timelessness of this classic poem with an edge that incorporates movements in art from Carroll’s time to the present. The Snark may never be found, but the hunt for him has never been more arresting.

lewis-carroll

LEWIS CARROLL (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) was a uniquely inventive literary genius, famed for three magical works: Alice’s Adventures in WonderlandThrough the Looking-Glass, and the humorous, witty, whimsical The Hunting of the Snark

MAHENDRA SINGH is an illustrator and longstanding Lewis Carroll fan. He is a member of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America, and an editor for their journal, the Knight Letter. For Singh, creating the illustrations for The Hunting of the Snark ”has been a labor of love—fitting Lewis Carroll into a proto-Surrealist straitjacket with matching Dada cufflinks.”

“Delightfully surreal…save this book for the brightest and most adventurous young word-worms on your holiday shopping list…Singh’s daring illustrations will appeal to older children eager to leave the world of candy-colored cuteness behind.” —The New Yorker

“At last, the legend of the brave, if peculiar, companions who set out to bag a snark (arming themselves “with forks and with hope”) gets lavish treatment from [Mahendra] Singh….These may be the fittest illustrations ever created for Carroll’s distinctively Victorian nonsense concoctions.” —Laura Miller, Salon

“[C]hallenging and delightful.” —Marilyn Dahl, Shelf Awareness

“It is not children who ought to read the words of Lewis Carroll.” —G.K. Chesterton

Singh’s black-and-white surrealistic treatment of Carroll’s classic poem is perfect…takes the ideology of Carroll’s nonsense to new visual levels. Far beyond a simplistic, literal depiction of the poem, each panel is thoughtfully created, filled with puzzles, jokes, and allusions. Library Journal

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